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Photo listing : road environments (problem)

The most recent photos are listed first. See also photomap view.

This listing only shows photos within East Kilbride.
Go to the national CycleStreets photo listings for photos beyond.

A hostile road environment for anyone cycling to the Kingsgate Retail Park. The roundabout decoration does nothing to improve it.

A busy junction between Kittoch Street and West Mains Road.

No dropped kerb at end of path at Columbia Way.

The footbridge across the railway in #113719 leads to the busy Eaglesham Road and there is no pedestrian crossing to help people get to either the bus stop or Hairmyres Hospital a short distance away.

There's a bend ahead if you can get through the flytipping!

Extremely busy crossing on NCR 756. Either have to step out into traffic when queuing or wait for driver to give way. Pedestrian island between lanes is barely wide enough to accommodate bicycle.

A split pelican crossing across Redwood Drive, rather than a toucan crossing with extra call buttons, when it forms part of a cycling route. It took a while for the lights to change.

The Stewartfield Way cycleway crosses Macneish Way (which is the entrance to the Morrison's supermarket) here, but no help to cross this busy road, not even use of a central island due to where the dropped kerbs have been installed.

The footway on this section of West Mains Road is not shared-use, although it looks little different from the section that is, and the carriageway is just as busy and fast-paced, so why not fill this gap in the network?

No room for a cycleway alongside Queensway between Righead and The Murray Roundabouts? Pedestrians have their own footway all the way.

A split toucan crossing across A749 dual carriageway for NCN756 to get to Nerston village en route to Rutherglen and Glasgow.

No improvement at the Kingsgate Retail Park entrance crossing on NCN756.

A new pedestrian crossing connecting the shared-use footway on Stewartfield Way to a sports centre across the road. Why no provision for cycling across?

To get onto the cycle route to Stewartfield from NCN756 on West Mains Road, the simplest way appears to be to use the slip onto Torrance Road and then the dropped kerb inside the junction.

A decrepit shared footway approaching the uncontrolled crossing across the High Common Road sliproad from Strathaven Road. Room for improvement.

Dumped rubbish partially blocking a dropped kerb at Fir Drive garages.

The continuity of Netherton Road (now a path) has been destroyed by the junction at Applegate Drive. Not even a dropped kerb at the end of the path (which has been slewed away from its original alignment).

East Kilbride's cycle route 1 crosses Greenhills Road at this roundabout. There is a plan to dual Greenhills Road because it is so busy at peak times (although you'd never guess at 11am!).

East Kilbride's cycle route 1 crosses Greenhills Road at this roundabout. Quiet enough mid morning, but this road is so busy at peak times it is to be dualled.

Where now? Again, missing any signage, East Kilbride's cycle route 1 goes onto what looks like a footway at the far side of the junction, which is a path that leads to an underpass at the Righead Roundabout.

No sign on East Kilbride's cycle route 1 for the turn into Brouster Hill. There is a sign in the other direction, see #31508.

The shared-use footway changes sides across the A726 dual carriageway, but the crossing is only a pedestrian crossing and not a toucan crossing.

King Street's cycle lane doubles as an overtaking lane when there are parked cars about. A contraflow has been provided on the one-way section by permitting cycling on the existing footway.

Users of this cycle lane need to look out for oncoming motorists overtaking parked cars.

The solution to the Whistleberry gap was not to build a ramp to the steps next to the A725, but to sign the existing footway as a cycleway, including a couple of toucan crossings across the A724. It has also been signed with (74) signs even ... [more]

NCN74 crosses the entrance to a busy supermarket, which, being some distance from much local housing, is accessed mostly by car.

At the top of the ramp from the retail park, no pedestrian crossing across Palace Grounds Road to get to the other pedestrian crossings on the fast and busy A72/A723 roundabout! There is no pedestrian crossing across Keith St here either, s ... [more]

Poorly maintained paving and lighting on ramp between Palace Grounds and Castle Street. This stuff isn't cheap to install, so why let it go to waste?

Motoring convenience prioritised over walking and cycling at minor Chapel St junction.

Space for motoring, but only one bus at the bus stop at a time please! And no-one will want to walk to the bus stop from this direction. Someone did cycle along the dual carriageway just after I'd taken the photo, in all the proper cycling ... [more]

Space for motoring. Even the pedestrian infrastructure is pretty flaky, leading to people walking along the verge.

Route (74) turns right, but the dropped kerb is on the left.

Poor alignment of cycle lane for those going straight on, and for the eagle-eyed, route (74) turns left.

An unsignalled crossing of Blantyre Farm Road, next to the busy A724 mini-roundabout, for primary school children. The dropped kerb doesn't even match the width of the cycle markings.

Route (74) goes for an unsignalled crossing of Blantyre Farm Road next to the busy A724 mini-roundabout.

Primary school children are expected to cycle along the A724 with only painted cycle lanes for "protection" on route (74).

Back onto the footway for the roundabout.

A door-zone cycle lane past a layby, and if you get hit, there's nowhere for passing motorists to swerve to avoid hitting you.

Just when the road gets to a narrow bit on a slight climb, the cycle lane stops briefly.

I don't know what the designer thought would happen here.

The cycle lane can only be accessed by going across the footway, but watch out for the raised kerb at the end. Only the kerb at the footway side is dropped. (See also #88922)

So I think you are meant to just cycle over the footway to get to the cycle lane, but watch that kerb! (See also #88923)

The cycle lane ends and cyclists directed onto the footway. This sign has (74) rather than the 74 used on other signs nearby. Note also the crayon bike symbol on the carriageway.

A very tight turn around the call point post to get into the cycle lane.

The M74 junction cycleway starts just after a slight road narrowing, so users will have to take a defensive road position to avoid being run over, in which case they could just continue on the road in such a position.

Narrow cycle lanes with no parking restrictions. When there were offices and other workplaces along here there would be lots of daytime car parking here. Shawfield Road represents a more direct route to Rutherglen than NCN756. Some of th ... [more]

It seems the designer expects cyclists to cross to the park using the toucan crossing away to the right, rather than crossing the centre of the junction. Coming from the park there are no push-buttons for the crossing at the park gate.

While other parts of the country are starting to build bus stop bypasses, South Lanarkshire has come up with this. A triangular area marked as a bus stop, then the cycle lane transfers onto the footway, and the bus stop pole is just beyond ... [more]

Is the designer of this facility designing for triangular cars in the parking bay? Cycle lane in the doorzone.

Just as suddenly as when it started (in #70539) the cycle lane jumps back to the kerbside, just in time for some car parking.

After the bus stop the cycle lane suddenly jumps from the kerbside to the middle of the carriageway, and motorists are just driving in it.

Intermittent cycle lanes and car parking. Plus central hatching showing how much space is available to waste.

Hardly an 8-80 type of environment on NCN74 on the A724. Paint with no consideration for creating space for cycling.

The cycle route joins the A724, at a signalised roundabout. An Advance Stop Line has been provided, nothing else. From the signs further along the road, it appears cyclists are meant to join the footway at the far side of this junction ( ... [more]

Hamilton Road appears to be quite a busy rat-run, and traffic calming has been provided by means of chicanes. Advisory cycle lanes have been painted in one direction through these chicanes. This appears to encourage motorists to overtake cy ... [more]

An advisory cycle lane painted around one side of a traffic-calming chicane. Is this to encourage motorists to overtake cyclists in the chicane? A wider view of this location is at #70529.

The traffic calming on Hamilton Road is by means of chicanes. Cycle lanes have been painted in one direction through these chicanes.

Some of the cycle lanes on Reid Street were painted, then scorched off and then repainted narrower, before being coloured red. But with the kerbside and footway parking, an utter waste of time and money!

Short lengths of cycle lane have been painted on Reid Street. A complete waste of time and money! No attempt made to tackle the footway parking, and now there is cycle lane parking too.

The painted cycle lanes on King Street lead straight into the kerbside car parking in Caledonia Avenue.

On-road cycle lanes on King Street, with the westbound side being in the doorzone of a parking lay-by outside Royal Burgh House.

The central cycle lane heads through the No Entry signs before turning onto the footway. Would it not have been better to move the Give Way line back and allow cyclists onto the footway with the protection of the buildout rather than cyclin ... [more]

The junction of NCN74 on King Street and NCN756 on the shared footway of Glasgow Road (see also #70517). Users are expected to bump a kerb and pass a No Entry sign.

The gate across the path through to New Douglas Park has a No Entry sign on it when the path is (presumably) not one-way. The shared use sign is used on a totally unsuitable footway, in a dead-end street.

Narrow crossing of minor side street.

Advance Stop Line at the A70/A73 junction at Hyndford Bridge (at end of cycle track seen in #49697), and cycle route sign for Biggar for cyclists coming from Lanark. If turning left, note that the traffic signals will change for traffic ... [more]

Approaching the end of the cycle lanes on the Lanark to Hyndford road. Cars are parked all over the place! This section of road is used by traffic from both the A73 and A70.

Cycle lane encroachment on approach to roundabout. Note how much of the red surface has been worn away.

I'm not sure what the designers were thinking here.

No Entry signs at road closure, without "except cycles" plates, but route signage between Hamilton town centre and NCN 74 directs cyclists through closure and across toucan crossing

NCN 74 leaves road here to use Bothwell Nature Trail path, but there is no dropped kerb to allow cyclists up onto the footway. UPDATE: A dropped kerb has now been provided, next to the wooden fencing on the left.

Adding narrow cycle lanes to a busy and fast road does not make it safe to cycle! (50mph limit inter-urban road)

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